Untitled

awriterscorner:

Oh yeahhhh

awriterscorner:

Oh yeahhhh

ornamentedbeing:

I apologize if this is completely wrong. I used Google Translate so that I could understand the text. Apologies!  

Black court dress, Empress Elisabeth

Manufacturer: Fanni Scheiner

Owner: Empress Elisabeth daughter of Maximilian of Bavaria Wittelsbach
1837 - 1898

Black court dress of Empress Elisabeth

Vienna
about 1885

At festive events wore ladies of the court, and at their head the Empress, dresses with trains, whose length was determined by the importance of the occasion.While these Hofkleider in the first half of the 19thCentury were mostly in bright colors was, in the early days black as very elegant.

The shown court dress of Empress Elisabeth has worked in two parts and consists of a skirt with cut and a train about to bear top with side falling waterfalls.

The carved from black silk moiré skirt on the rear center waist fixes a drapery of the same fabric that is twice bagged and filled with two large Moiréemaschen.The draping ends in a ruffle.The train is under the draping pleated and decorated the edge with Posamentriespitze and Jetperlen and with four stops.

The crafted from the same material top is reinforced with whalebone.It is closed at the front by round, covered with pearls Posamentrie and wooden buttons.The side of the closure of each peak with a waterfall and Posamentrie Jetverzierung.At the top of two downwardly tapered plastic parts are attached, the lead from the rear to the front waist center and frame the drape of the skirt.They are bordered with jetverzierter Posamentriespitze.The sleeves are decorated with sewn-shaped cuff and Musselinrüschen Posamentriespitze with Jetperlen.

In the girdle of the upper part of the company name Hofschneiderin Fanny Scheiner is woven, which could use that title since 1877.

Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, Carriages and Department of Court Uniforms

tiny-librarian:

On the front of Mary Tudor Tower, the Governor of the Military Knights’ house in the Lower Ward of Windsor Castle, can be seen a carved panel displaying the arms of Philip II and Mary I. Such representations are rare since the royal marriage lasted only four and a half years, from July 1554 until Mary’s death in November 1558. When the carved panel was described by heraldic artist Thomas Willement in his book, Royal Heraldry, published in 1821, it appears to have been in a poor state of repair:   
‘On a tower of Windsor Castle, appropriate to the Governor of the Poor Knights of St George, is a stone compartment, surrounded by ornamental mouldings: within which have been sculptured the arms of Philip and Mary, impaled, within the garter and crowned; supported on the dexter side by an eagle, with wings endorsed; and on the sinister by a lion. Under the eagle is a slip of pomegranates, and under the lion a rose branch. The whole of the achievement is so much defaced that there remain but mere indications of the heraldic ornaments; the supporters are entirely destroyed, the outline only being discernible. At the top of the compartment appears to have been written Philip’s motto, “Colit Ardua Virtus’ and at the bottom, “Veritas Temporis Filia”, which latter sentence was used by Mary on her great seal previous to her marriage.’
The panel, which according to the historian Elias Ashmole had been originally carved by Henry Carrant in 1558, has been renewed more than once since Willement described it in the early 19th century.  Following the outline of the original, the coat of arms has been resculpted, displaying the Hapsburg arms of Philip II on one side (dexter) of the shield side-by-side (impaled) with the royal arms of Mary as Queen of England on the other side (sinister), with the eagle and pomegranates representing Spain and the lion and rose branch symbolising England.  Mary’s motto, carved at the bottom of the panel, means ‘Truth, the daughter of Time’.

tiny-librarian:

On the front of Mary Tudor Tower, the Governor of the Military Knights’ house in the Lower Ward of Windsor Castle, can be seen a carved panel displaying the arms of Philip II and Mary I. Such representations are rare since the royal marriage lasted only four and a half years, from July 1554 until Mary’s death in November 1558. When the carved panel was described by heraldic artist Thomas Willement in his book, Royal Heraldry, published in 1821, it appears to have been in a poor state of repair:  

‘On a tower of Windsor Castle, appropriate to the Governor of the Poor Knights of St George, is a stone compartment, surrounded by ornamental mouldings: within which have been sculptured the arms of Philip and Mary, impaled, within the garter and crowned; supported on the dexter side by an eagle, with wings endorsed; and on the sinister by a lion. Under the eagle is a slip of pomegranates, and under the lion a rose branch. The whole of the achievement is so much defaced that there remain but mere indications of the heraldic ornaments; the supporters are entirely destroyed, the outline only being discernible. At the top of the compartment appears to have been written Philip’s motto, “Colit Ardua Virtus’ and at the bottom, “Veritas Temporis Filia”, which latter sentence was used by Mary on her great seal previous to her marriage.’

The panel, which according to the historian Elias Ashmole had been originally carved by Henry Carrant in 1558, has been renewed more than once since Willement described it in the early 19th century.  Following the outline of the original, the coat of arms has been resculpted, displaying the Hapsburg arms of Philip II on one side (dexter) of the shield side-by-side (impaled) with the royal arms of Mary as Queen of England on the other side (sinister), with the eagle and pomegranates representing Spain and the lion and rose branch symbolising England.  Mary’s motto, carved at the bottom of the panel, means ‘Truth, the daughter of Time’.


fyeah-history:

The “Hampden” portrait of Elizabeth I of England, an early full-length portrait of the young queen in a red satin gownThe “Hampden” portrait, by Steven van der Meulen, ca. 1563. This is the earliest full-length portrait of the queen, made before the emergence of symbolic portraits representing the iconography of the “Virgin Queen”.

fyeah-history:

The “Hampden” portrait of Elizabeth I of England, an early full-length portrait of the young queen in a red satin gown
The “Hampden” portrait, by Steven van der Meulen, ca. 1563. This is the earliest full-length portrait of the queen, made before the emergence of symbolic portraits representing the iconography of the “Virgin Queen”.

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